• 8:00 am-4:00 pm Monday - Friday
    24/7 Emergency Service Available
  • 107 Action Ln, Summerville, SC 29483
  • actionac@hotmail.com

AC Repair in Sullivan's Island, SC

Ask us Anything

843-890-0532

Quick Quote

South Carolina is one of the most beautiful places in the United States to call home. However, our local weather can be extreme - high temps and thick humidity in the summer and chilly winter weather during cold months. As a local HVAC company in Sullivan's Island, SC, we know how crucial it is to have a quality HVAC system in your home and experienced technicians to keep it working correctly.

With more than 35 years of serving the Lowcountry, we are proud to be an active part of our local community. As your neighbors, we are here for all of your HVAC needs, whether you need a new AC unit installed this summer or a heat pump replacement this winter. With a reliable team of NATE-certified technicians and decades of experience in our industry, no HVAC project is too big or small for us to handle.

We offer highly competitive pricing and convenient financing options for all of our clients. At the end of the day, our goal is to make it easy and affordable to live comfortably in your home all year long. We are committed to hard work, honesty, and integrity with every service we offer. If you aren't 100% satisfied with our work, we'll do our part to make it right.

Service Areas

Here are just a few of the reasons why homeowners and business owners in South Carolina trust Action Heating & Air Conditioning:

  • We have been serving clients in South Carolina since 1983 - before many of our clients were even born!
  • We provide a wide range of HVAC services for both heating and air conditioning.
  • We are committed to giving our clients the highest quality products and services at affordable prices.
  • As a Carrier® Factory Authorized Dealer, we have the best HVAC units available.
  • We are members of the South Carolina Association of Heating and Air Conditioning Contractors.
  • We are members of our local Chamber of Commerce and the Air Conditioning Contractors of America.

If you need a trusted AC repair company in Sullivan's Island, know that our team is geared up and ready to help you today. While you browse our website, have a look at just a few of our specialties here at Action Heating & Air Conditioning:

Air Conditioning Repair in Sullivan's Island, SC

Summers in the Lowcountry are hot, humid, and sticky. After a long day at the beach or downtown with your friends, nothing feels better than kicking back on the sofa while your air conditioning cools you off. On the other hand, nothing feels worse than walking into your home and feeling warm, stale air hit your face. Those who know, know - having your AC go out during a South Carolina summer is no joke. With time, a relatively minor inconvenience can turn into a real health problem.

In situations like these, something has probably gone wrong with your HVAC system. If your AC has stopped working in the middle of summer, it's time to call Action Heating & Air Conditioning right away. Our team of certified HVAC professionals has years of experience repairing and servicing AC equipment. It doesn't matter how old your unit is or what brand you bought - we have the skills to get your home comfort system up and running in no time.

Heating And Air Conditioning Sullivan's Island, SC
Here are just a few of the AC issues that our talented team can help solve for you:
 Heating And Air Conditioning Services Sullivan's Island, SC

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Over time, condensation builds up in your AC equipment because of its cooling process. This accumulated byproduct must be drained regularly, or the increased amounts of moisture can damage your air conditioner's components.

 AC Repair Services Sullivan's Island, SC

Air Conditioning Refrigerant Leak

Refrigerant is the substance responsible for keeping your home nice and cool in the summer. When refrigerant levels drop due to a leak, it will affect your AC equipment's ability to cool your home. If your HVAC unit isn't blowing cold air, this could be a reason why.

 HVAC Repair Services Sullivan's Island, SC

Heater Keeps Running

This is a common AC issue in South Carolina and the U.S. in general. Sometimes this problem is fixed by switching your thermostat to "auto." If that doesn't work, you may have a broken thermostat or a wiring issue that needs to be addressed quickly.

 Air Conditioning Sullivan's Island, SC

Burning Odors

It's normal for your heater to produce a slight burning smell if it hasn't been used in a while. However, if you are experiencing a persistent burning smell during the summer months when your air conditioning is on, it could be a serious problem. Turn off your HVAC system immediately and call our office as soon as possible so that we may send out a technician to diagnose your problem.

 AC Repair Sullivan's Island, SC

Broken Air Conditioning Compressor Fan

This fan plays an important role in your AC unit's heat transfer process. When your air conditioning fan breaks, your AC equipment won't be able to cool your home off in the summer when it's needed the most.

Our Special Offers

One of our goals as a company is to provide HVAC repair services at fair and competitive prices. In addition, we want you to feel confident about investing in high-quality heating and cooling systems without having to worry a lot about the costs. We make sure to provide honest and accurate quotes and we offer a variety of financing options. We want you to get the best bang for your buck, so here are some special offers.

See Our Offer

If you are experiencing any of the problems above, be sure to hire a professional contractor to fix your issues. For your safety, don't ever try to make HVAC repairs on your own unless you are trained. When the time come to have your air conditioning system repaired, our team of licensed AC technicians will handle all of the hard work on your behalf. That way, you can stay safe and have peace of mind knowing you're in good hands.

Air Conditioning Install in Sullivan's Island, SC

Your HVAC system works hard all year long. If you have gone years without much maintenance or AC repair, you probably bought a great HVAC unit. However, with constant use and even normal wear and tear, even the highest-quality HVAC systems are prone to malfunctions. Eventually, it will need to be replaced.

If you need an energy-efficient, reliable cooling system for your home or business, you have come to the right place. We have decades of experience installing new AC systems for our clients and can handle any installation project you have. As a Carrier® Factory Authorized Dealer, we have the most top-rated AC systems available in South Carolina.

At Action Heating & Air Conditioning, we know that buying a new air conditioner and installing it can be a huge source of stress. But when you work with us, it doesn't have to be that way. We have made it our mission to make the AC installation process easy and efficient for our customers. That way, they can focus more on living life and enjoying their home while we work hard on their AC install in Sullivan's Island.

Whether you plan to replace a faulty air conditioning system or need a Carrier unit for your new construction home, we have got you covered. We will work with you directly to find the best fit for your home and budget. We are also happy to answer all of your AC installation questions prior to and during your initial service appointment.

 Heater Repair Services Sullivan's Island, SC

Common Signs That You Need a New AC Install in Sullivan's Island, SC

Trying to figure out whether your air conditioner needs to be repaired or replaced can be a tricky decision to make. Most people have a hard time letting things go, and that includes AC units. It can be hard to know when to let go of the old and welcome in the new. To help save you time and make your decision a little easier, keep the following signs in mind. If you find yourself saying, "that sounds like my AC unit," it might be time for a new air conditioning installation.

 HVAC Repair Sullivan's Island, SC

Strange Noises

Almost all air conditioners make a bit of low-level noise as they warm up and turn off. However, if you hear loud, unusual noises, it might be a sign that your air conditioner's time is coming to an end. Buzzing and rattling noises are often indicators of a loose part. Grinding and whistling noises may mean something more serious is happening. Because these issues won't dissipate over time, it's crucial to have your air conditioner examined if you hear loud, strange noises.

Frequent Repairs

Sullivan's Island AC repair is essential for keeping your air conditioner working efficiently. Sometimes, however, it makes more sense from a cost perspective to install a replacement system. This is especially true if your repairs are racking up. Some AC experts suggest using the "$5,000 rule" if you're considering a new AC install. Simply multiply the age of your air conditioner by the costs you have been paying to repair your unit. If that amount is over $5,000, it may make more financial sense to install a new air conditioner rather than pay for expensive repairs throughout the year.

Higher Energy Bills

If you notice that your energy bill has significantly increased in price, it could be a sign that your HVAC unit is struggling to cool your home effectively. Try to be mindful of your air conditioner's cooling cycles. If you notice frequent cycles, even in the summer, it could be the reason for your increased energy bill. In these cases, it's best to have an expert test your system to see if a repair or replacement option is best for your family.

Age of Air Conditioning Unit

This sign is a no-brainer and one of the easiest ways to tell if you need to install a new AC system. On average, your HVAC unit will have a lifespan of 12 to 15 years. If your unit is more than ten years old and doesn't have the "pizzaz" that it once had, it might be time to think about installing a new air conditioning unit.

R-22 Refrigerant

Old air conditioners usually require a type of refrigerant called R-22. This substance is very harmful to the environment and has been all but outlawed on newer HVAC systems. If your AC unit is old enough to require R-22, you should give serious thought to replacing your system with a newer, environmentally friendly solution.

Call Action Heating & Air Conditioning Today!

Over our 35+ year history, we have built our reputation on honesty, skilled workmanship, and reasonable pricing. If you are on the hunt for the highest quality air conditioning repair in Sullivan's Island, SC, give our office a call today.

Call us at 843-890-0532

Protecting Your Investment

Your air conditioning system works very hard every day, all year long to keep your home comfy and cool. Machines that work hard year-round are going to require maintenance and ongoing services to stay operational.

As a family-owned and operated HVAC company in Sullivan's Island, SC, we know better than anyone how expensive it can be to maintain an AC unit. We know that money doesn't grow on trees. We also understand that finding last-minute resources to fix an air conditioning system can be challenging. That is why we offer extended warranties for your new or existing AC equipment. With an extended warranty from Action Heating & Air Conditioning, you benefit from repairs, replacement, and additional services covered under warranty. That way, you can enjoy your HVAC products as long as possible.

 Heating And AC Services Sullivan's Island, SC
If you're having second thoughts about purchasing an extended warranty, consider these points:
  • Generally speaking, HVAC equipment lasts anywhere from 10 to 15 years. However, warranties provided by the factory will often expire before the service life of your cooling unit is over. With an extended warranty, your indoor comfort system is covered even if the factory warranty expires.
  • Having an extended warranty on your AC system gives you the chance to project and plan for any HVAC costs. This helps you balance your budget and anticipate expenses so you aren't caught off guard. Having a warranty will also help protect your budget against increases in labor and parts costs due to inflation.
  • If you're thinking of selling your home, having an extended warranty may help raise your home's value. You may also be able to transfer your extended warranty to your new home if you choose to do so.

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

SC finishes sea turtle nesting season with record-breaking inventory

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are ...

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.

Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.

Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.

For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.

As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are optimistic the reptiles are beginning to recover.

“Increased nest counts since the mid- to late-2000s show promise for the loggerhead,” said Michelle Pate, nesting program leader for DNR. “We’re seeing the continued benefits of conservation measured enacted decades ago as well as those management techniques still used today.”

Among the most interesting finds this season was the oddity of a leucistic sea turtle on Folly Beach. While most loggerhead turtles are dark, leucistic animals are white, pale or patchy in color because of their reduced pigmentation.

Dave Miller, the permit holder for the Folly Beach Turtle Team, found the special turtle in September.

“I saw these two turtles coming out of the nest and they were covered with sand,” Miller said. “And then the wave washed them over and one of them was white. I didn’t realize it when it was covered in sand.”

Leucism increases animals’ chances of being taken by predators. And in areas like Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island, coyotes are among the top predators for sea turtles.

Turtle patrol volunteers work to find sea turtle nests on beaches before coyotes do.

“What the Wild Dunes coyotes have learned to do is ambush the turtle as she comes out of the water in the middle of the night and begins to lay her eggs,” said Mary Pringle, a project leader for the Island Turtle Team in Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island.

The coyotes will often eat the turtle’s eggs before volunteers can get to them in the morning and place plastic screens over the nests. The animals can’t destroy the nests once that happens. But volunteers can’t predict when and where a turtle will choose to nest.

“When I started (volunteering), we didn’t have any coyotes,” Pringle said. “We had raccoons and ghost crabs as predators, but not coyotes. And it’s just something that’s happening all over the coast.”

Foxes and the emergence of armadillos on beaches have also become a reason for nest losses in the state.

Pate said other concerns include artificial lighting on heavily populated beaches, and people intercepting nesting females at night.

Even with predators like coyotes, sea turtle species in the state have found a way to prevail. Many new turtles nested here for the first time this season.

“And they (scientists) are cautiously optimistic that it will continue because of nest protection efforts — saving nests, making sure they hatch like we did and all the other people who do the same thing that we do for DNR,” Pringle said.

Pringle’s Island Turtle Team is one of about 30 groups along the coast that patrol beaches from May 1 to Oct. 31 to count, monitor and protect the nests. DNR said there are more than 1,500 volunteers coastwide.

Fifty-seven total nests were spotted this year on the Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island. And 4,602 turtles hatched on those islands.

Most of the nests there were in the Wild Dunes area.

Thirty-four nests were were counted on Myrtle Beach; 99 on Folly Beach; 483 on Kiawah Island; 351 at Edisto Beach State Park; and 423 on Hilton Head Island, according to data.

Loggerheads nest on the state’s shores more often than any other species, but greens, Kemp’s ridleys and leatherbacks also have a presence here.

Each species is classified as endangered or threatened and receive protections under the Endangered Species Acts. Extra state protections are also in place.

This year, 7,974 nests were counted in the state, 21 green turtle nests and one Kemp’s ridley nest.

Green turtles and Kemp’s ridleys are primarily found in other regions of North America, including Florida and the western Gulf of Mexico.

“I think in the history of Folly Beach Turtle Team, we’ve had maybe two leatherbacks,” Miller said. “And everything else has been loggerheads.”

Other species will pop up on the beach, maybe for food, but choose to nest in other locations.

DNR said beachgoers can help the state’s sea turtles by keeping beaches clean, giving the animals and their nests space and turning beachfront lights out to avoid disorienting them during nesting season.

South Carolina Department Of Transportation Stops, Restarts Work On Isle Of Palms Connector Restriping Options

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye NewsThe South Carolina Department of Transportation stopped working on a study that will provide options to restripe the Isle of Palms Connector in late October, apparently in response to a lawsuit filed by an organization founded by a former IOP mayor and a current Council member.According to IOP City Administrator Desiree Fragoso, she was informed by the SCDOT the evening of Oct. 31 “that they may be pausing the study.” Four days later, on Nov. 4, Fragoso got the word that SCDOT...

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News

The South Carolina Department of Transportation stopped working on a study that will provide options to restripe the Isle of Palms Connector in late October, apparently in response to a lawsuit filed by an organization founded by a former IOP mayor and a current Council member.

According to IOP City Administrator Desiree Fragoso, she was informed by the SCDOT the evening of Oct. 31 “that they may be pausing the study.” Four days later, on Nov. 4, Fragoso got the word that SCDOT was moving forward with plans to present its findings to the IOP Council, either on Nov. 15 or Dec. 6, Fragoso said.

“We paused our work in order to let the attorneys review the situation,” Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall said in a Nov. 7 email. “Following their review, we resumed work a few days later. The pause had no significant impact. We are still on track to meet with IOP city officials prior to the end of the calendar year.” Mayor Phillip Pounds said the city did not negotiate with the state agency during the week the study was paused but instead “leveraged our relationships SCDOT and State Sen. (Chip) Campsen to get this thing back on track.” Pounds said SCDOT probably would present eight to 10 options for the Connector bridge at the city Council’s Dec. 6 meeting. The next step is “still to be determined.” Pounds noted that the Council, the Public Safety Committee – headed by Jan Anderson – and the general public might all play a role in paring the options down to a workable number. Without any input from the city of Isle of Palms, SCDOT re-striped the bridge in March 2021, adding two bike lanes and two pedestrian lanes and shrinking the center emergency lane from 10 feet to 4 feet. A year later, former Mayor Jimmy Carroll and sitting Council Member Blair Hahn formed The Palm Republic, a privately funded organization that has questioned the constitutionality of S.40, a law passed in 2021 which grants SCDOT the authority to determine where visitors to IOP, Sullivan’s Island, Edisto and Folly Beach can park on state roads and how much, if anything, these municipalities can charge them. The Palm Republic recently filed a petition and complaint with the South Carolina Supreme Court in an effort to force SCDOT to treat these four communities as it treats the state’s other municipalities. The lawsuit also claims that SCDOT violated the Constitution by restriping the bridge without input from the city. Hahn was not happy with what appeared to be SCDOT’s reaction to The Palm Republic’s lawsuit. “Every citizen has a right to challenge the constitutionality of any statute,” Hahn said. “If a government entity threatens to withhold government services because a citizen is challenging the constitutionality of a statute, that government entity should be held accountable because that’s illegal.” “SCDOT didn’t do a single engineering study or engineering report when they re-striped the bridge. They did nothing except follow the direction of those on high,” Hahn added. Fragoso, meanwhile, said the city would work with SCDOT to find ways to make the configuration of the Connector bridge more palatable to the Council and the community.

“We continue to work collaboratively with DOT in solving issues in our community that need addressing, and we’re eager to see the final report on the IOP Connector, evaluate the options presented and discuss the best path for that project,” Fragoso said.

Sullivan's Island residents launch campaign to get rid of fractional ownership homes

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island banned short-term rentals more than two decades ago, except those that were grandfathered in.Residents are concerned with one company they say is bending the rules.Tim Emrich says the home, located at 3115 Ion Avenue, has fractional ownership and is overseen by Pacaso.Emrich said Sullivan's Island is for families and retirees, not people on vacation, and with three children, they don’t want to live next to a home with many different owners.According to...

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island banned short-term rentals more than two decades ago, except those that were grandfathered in.

Residents are concerned with one company they say is bending the rules.

Tim Emrich says the home, located at 3115 Ion Avenue, has fractional ownership and is overseen by Pacaso.

Emrich said Sullivan's Island is for families and retirees, not people on vacation, and with three children, they don’t want to live next to a home with many different owners.

According to him, other residents on Sullivan's Island share his opinion and are not happy about it.

To try and stop it, he and his wife created a campaign to keep Sullivan's Island community oriented.

"We saw an advertisement where you could buy 1/8 of the house. After we dug a little deeper, it became apparent that this was, this is really a scheme to circumvent the rules that have been in place for over 20 years in a small town that limit short-term rentals; they prohibit them unless you were one of the properties prior 20 years ago," Emrich said.

Driving up and down streets on Sullivan's Island, you can't miss the signs that read "Stop timeshares on Sullivan's."

Emrich and his wife passed around the yard signs and have been attending town council meetings to try and stop Pacaso from selling homes on the barrier island.

"Our aim is to first of all raise awareness. We've obviously got over 200 signs out across the island. Any residents you speak to on Sullivan's Island adamantly oppose this game. Every member of the council is opposed to the scheme. And so, really, we're pushing the politicians to do something about it," Emrich said.

Emrich tells us the campaign's primary goal is to get town leaders to enforce the rules that are already on the books and push these types of companies and homes out.

He says communities across the country have successfully fought these types of companies.

"They're assuring us that they are on this. The government does not move this fast, and we would like them to, but they are giving us every assurance that they that they're going to do something about it," Emrich said.

Mayor Patrick O'Neil says residents feel short-term rentals destroy the sense of neighborhood.

He thinks no one wants to live next to a group of people on their first night of vacation.

“After a great deal of research and study, last week we issued a notice of zoning violation to the owners of the property in question here, and we are awaiting a response," Mayor O'Brien said.

Pacaso spokesperson Brian McGuigan stated: "Pacaso is not a timeshare. We help families co-own second homes, which is common practice and can help reduce competition for single-family homes on Sullivan's Island. Research shows that co-ownership contributes more to the local economy than the typical second home while redirecting second home buyers away from median-priced single-family homes in demand by locals and into high-end, luxury homes.”

Pacaso explains they aren’t a timeshare and retain no ownership interest in the home once sold, but they provide property management services.

Pacaso insists they will collaborate with Sullivan's Island leaders on any related public policy questions.

The company believes an ordinance addressing Pacaso’s model could broadly impact many houses.

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

Find American history and really big trees at South Carolina’s top national parks

The Palmetto State has more than its fair share of sites that showcase key moments in American history, as well as a national park that showcases astounding champion trees.At these attractions, you can take your sweet time strolling nature paths, listening to the birdsong and admiring nature’s beauty – while learning about the Revolutionary War, the Civil War and Reconstruction.Here are the best national park experiences in...

The Palmetto State has more than its fair share of sites that showcase key moments in American history, as well as a national park that showcases astounding champion trees.

At these attractions, you can take your sweet time strolling nature paths, listening to the birdsong and admiring nature’s beauty – while learning about the Revolutionary War, the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Here are the best national park experiences in South Carolina.

Explore the planet’s most surprising adventures with our weekly newsletter delivered to your inbox.

Admire the majestic trees of Congaree National Park

Discover the towering scope of ancient trees with a visit to South Carolina’s only “scenic” national park. Primordial cypresses, giant upland pines and water tupelos count among its towering specimens – the highest concentration of “champion-size” trees (aka the biggest of their species) anywhere in North America.

Look out for the massive loblolly pine, which rises to over 170ft tall. If that’s not enough, the park also protects the eastern US’s largest tract of old-growth bottomland forest, low-lying land that’s periodically covered by water throughout the year.

The best way to see the trees – and to admire the beauty of this unique park – is along the 2.6-mile elevated Boardwalk Trail. You can also paddle along the Congaree River, its dark, tannic-dyed waters hiding turtles, frogs and other watery life.

Bring your own canoe or kayak, or join a paddling tour led by a park ranger. You can also rent a watercraft in Columbia, a 30-minute drive away.

Feel the Revolution at Cowpens National Battlefield

If you thought the Revolutionary War didn’t extend to the Southern states, think again. Among several battles that took place in South Carolina, one of the most significant took place at Cowpens.

The battle occurred on January 17, 1781, near present-day Gaffney. The site was, literally, a wide-open woodland (or “cowpens”) where early cattle drovers would camp overnight.

On the fateful day, Gen Daniel Morgan strategically deployed his Continental troops here against Lt Col Banastre Tarleton’s forces. The end result: more than 1000 losses for the British and about 150 for the Americans.

The park includes a visitor center and a walking tour through the battlefield.

Consider Charleston’s role in American history at Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park

Two forts guard the entrance to Charleston’s harbor, emblems of South Carolina’s roles in both the Civil War and Revolutionary War.

The more famous of the two is Fort Sumter. On April 12, 1861, the Confederate Army opened fire on the Union fort: the first battle of the Civil War. The bombardment ensued for 34 hours, followed by a Union surrender.

The Confederate troops occupied the installation, making it a symbol of resistance – though constant shelling from Union troops over the course of the war virtually destroyed it. Visitors today can see the cannons and fortifications that remain and hear lots of stories about this crucial fortification.

On nearby Sullivan’s Island, Fort Moultrie is where Col William Moultrie’s South Carolinians warded off a British attack in one of the Revolutionary War’s first Patriot victories.

The only way to visit both forts is by boat shuttle, departing from Liberty Sq in downtown Charleston and Patriots Point across the harbor.

Trace the steps of patriots at Kings Mountain National Military Park

Thomas Jefferson called it the “turn of the tide of success.” During the Revolutionary War, American and Loyalist soldiers clashed on this isolated ridge, just below the North Carolina line, on October 7, 1780.

Fighting tree to tree with rifles and bayonets, the rebels won the first American victory to occur after the British invasion of Charleston.

The park preserves important battle sites, with markers and monuments that detail the action. At the visitor center, you can watch an introductory film, see exhibits and consult a map of the walking trail that winds through the battlefield.

Explore more along the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail, a 330-mile route through Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina that follows the path of the American militia leading up to the battle of Kings Mountain.

You might feel under siege at Ninety Six

In addition to the famous Yorktown, the town of Ninety Six presents some of the Revolutionary War’s best remnants of original siege lines anywhere. Established in the early 1700s, this crossroads town was so named because of its location 96 miles from the nearest Keowee village.

Twelve roads passed through it – more than in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 1863 – helping it to flourish in terms of commerce, trade and transportation. Then the war came along.

In November 1775, Americans and Loyalists faced each other in a three-day battle here, ending in an uneasy truce. The Americans built an important post, subsequently seized by the British in 1780.

Another battle erupted in 1781, when Gen Nathanael Greene’s army arrived to take the British fort, initiating what became the war’s longest siege. Greene’s forces ultimately failed – though the British were so weakened, they moved their post to Charleston.

Today, the visitor center has exhibits on the site’s history, while walking trails wander past earthworks, cannon and exhibits.

Learn about plantation life at the Charles Pinckney National Historic Site

As a child, Charles Pinckney split his time between the family’s Charleston mansion and Snee Farm, a rice and indigo plantation just outside of Charleston where enslaved individuals toiled.

Pickney is also known for his political involvement in the revolutionary cause: he contributed at least 25 clauses to the U.S. Constitution, before serving four terms as state governor and Thomas Jefferson’s ambassador to Spain.

But as a member of one of the state’s wealthiest and most politically powerful families, Pinckney inherited the plantation (as well as the Charleston mansion) in 1782 and continued to run the "family business" – thanks to, per the 1810 census, 58 enslaved people.

While much of the plantation was sold off over the years, the NPS has preserved 28 acres of it as the Charles Pinckney National Historic Site, a quiet place sprinkled with ornamental gardens and pockets of moss-draped live oaks.

A visitor center occupies an old 1828 farmhouse, offering exhibits on Pinckney the politician, the African people he enslaved and the operations of the plantation.

There are walking trails and archaeological displays to explore: for instance, archaeologists have unearthed delftware and pearlware once used by the elite. Archaeologists also uncovered a bounty of colonoware – unrefined, handmade earthenware widely used by enslaved people on the property. Farm tours are also available.

Confront one of the US’ most momentous eras at Reconstruction Era National Historical Park

Many historians claim Beaufort County in the Lowcountry to be the birthplace of Reconstruction, the tumultuous, post–Civil War era (between 1861 and 1898) when the reunited nation faced the economic and social legacies of slavery.

Established only in 2019, Reconstruction Era National Historical Park is a work in progress, its aim to spotlight nationally important places and events throughout Beaufort County that reflect this stormy time.

The park includes four sites in and near Beaufort. Penn Center on St Helena Island was founded in 1862 by Northern missionaries as the first school in the South for formerly enslaved West Africans. Today, the historic building houses a cultural and educational center.

Enslaved people constructed Brick Baptist Church on St Helena Island for white planters. After emancipation, the edifice became a school for formerly enslaved individuals, and today it hosts an active church congregation.

On New Year’s Day in 1863, Union Army Gen Rufus Saxton publicly read the Emancipation Proclamation to 3,000 Black soldiers and formerly enslaved people at Port Royal’s Camp Saxton.

The Old Beaufort Firehouse in downtown Beaufort serves as the new park’s visitor center and offers a good starting point for your visit.

Lonely Planet’s USA’s National Parks is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip and what hidden discoveries await you. Marvel at the Grand Canyon, paddle the Everglades and rock climb in Joshua Tree; all with your trusted travel companion.

Buy USA's National Parks

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
Copyright © 2021 Action Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Top