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Action Heating & Air Conditioning in Daniel Island, SC

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South Carolina is one of the most beautiful places in the United States to call home. However, our local weather can be extreme – high temps and thick humidity in the summer and chilly winter weather during cold months. As a local HVAC company in Daniel Island, SC, we know how crucial it is to have a quality HVAC system in your home and experienced technicians to keep it working correctly.

With more than 35 years of serving the Lowcountry, we are proud to be an active part of our local community. As your neighbors, we are here for all of your HVAC needs, whether you need a new AC unit installed this summer or a heat pump replacement this winter. With a reliable team of NATE-certified technicians and decades of experience in our industry, no HVAC project is too big or small for us to handle.

We offer highly competitive pricing and convenient financing options for all of our clients. At the end of the day, our goal is to make it easy and affordable to live comfortably in your home all year long. We are committed to hard work, honesty, and integrity with every service we offer. If you aren’t 100% satisfied with our work, we’ll do our part to make it right.

Service Areas

Here are just a few of the reasons why homeowners and business owners in South Carolina trust Action Heating & Air Conditioning:

  • We have been serving clients in South Carolina since 1983 – before many of our clients were even born!
  • We provide a wide range of HVAC services for both heating and air conditioning.
  • We are committed to giving our clients the highest quality products and services at affordable prices.
  • As a Carrier® Factory Authorized Dealer, we have the best HVAC units available.
  • We are members of the South Carolina Association of Heating and Air Conditioning Contractors.
  • We are members of our local Chamber of Commerce and the Air Conditioning Contractors of America.

If you need a trusted AC repair company in Daniel Island, know that our team is geared up and ready to help you today. While you browse our website, have a look at just a few of our specialties here at Action Heating & Air Conditioning:

Air Conditioning Repair in Daniel Island, SC

Summers in the Lowcountry are hot, humid, and sticky. After a long day at the beach or downtown with your friends, nothing feels better than kicking back on the sofa while your air conditioning cools you off. On the other hand, nothing feels worse than walking into your home and feeling warm, stale air hit your face. Those who know, know – having your AC go out during a South Carolina summer is no joke. With time, a relatively minor inconvenience can turn into a real health problem.

In situations like these, something has probably gone wrong with your HVAC system. If your AC has stopped working in the middle of summer, it’s time to call Action Heating & Air Conditioning right away. Our team of certified HVAC professionals has years of experience repairing and servicing AC equipment. It doesn’t matter how old your unit is or what brand you bought – we have the skills to get your home comfort system up and running in no time.

Here are just a few of the AC issues that our talented team can help solve for you:
Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Over time, condensation builds up in your AC equipment because of its cooling process. This accumulated byproduct must be drained regularly, or the increased amounts of moisture can damage your air conditioner’s components.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Air Conditioning Refrigerant Leak

Refrigerant is the substance responsible for keeping your home nice and cool in the summer. When refrigerant levels drop due to a leak, it will affect your AC equipment’s ability to cool your home. If your HVAC unit isn’t blowing cold air, this could be a reason why.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Heater Keeps Running

This is a common AC issue in South Carolina and the U.S. in general. Sometimes this problem is fixed by switching your thermostat to “auto.” If that doesn’t work, you may have a broken thermostat or a wiring issue that needs to be addressed quickly.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Burning Odors

It’s normal for your heater to produce a slight burning smell if it hasn’t been used in a while. However, if you are experiencing a persistent burning smell during the summer months when your air conditioning is on, it could be a serious problem. Turn off your HVAC system immediately and call our office as soon as possible so that we may send out a technician to diagnose your problem.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Broken Air Conditioning Compressor Fan

This fan plays an important role in your AC unit’s heat transfer process. When your air conditioning fan breaks, your AC equipment won’t be able to cool your home off in the summer when it’s needed the most.

Our Special Offers

One of our goals as a company is to provide HVAC repair services at fair and competitive prices. In addition, we want you to feel confident about investing in high-quality heating and cooling systems without having to worry a lot about the costs. We make sure to provide honest and accurate quotes and we offer a variety of financing options. We want you to get the best bang for your buck, so here are some special offers.

See Our Offer

If you are experiencing any of the problems above, be sure to hire a professional contractor to fix your issues. For your safety, don’t ever try to make HVAC repairs on your own unless you are trained. When the time come to have your air conditioning system repaired, our team of licensed AC technicians will handle all of the hard work on your behalf. That way, you can stay safe and have peace of mind knowing you’re in good hands.

Air Conditioning Install in Daniel Island, SC

Your HVAC system works hard all year long. If you have gone years without much maintenance or AC repair, you probably bought a great HVAC unit. However, with constant use and even normal wear and tear, even the highest-quality HVAC systems are prone to malfunctions. Eventually, it will need to be replaced.

If you need an energy-efficient, reliable cooling system for your home or business, you have come to the right place. We have decades of experience installing new AC systems for our clients and can handle any installation project you have. As a Carrier® Factory Authorized Dealer, we have the most top-rated AC systems available in South Carolina.

At Action Heating & Air Conditioning, we know that buying a new air conditioner and installing it can be a huge source of stress. But when you work with us, it doesn’t have to be that way. We have made it our mission to make the AC installation process easy and efficient for our customers. That way, they can focus more on living life and enjoying their home while we work hard on their AC install in Daniel Island.

Whether you plan to replace a faulty air conditioning system or need a Carrier unit for your new construction home, we have got you covered. We will work with you directly to find the best fit for your home and budget. We are also happy to answer all of your AC installation questions prior to and during your initial service appointment.

Common Signs That You Need a New AC Install in Daniel Island, SC

Trying to figure out whether your air conditioner needs to be repaired or replaced can be a tricky decision to make. Most people have a hard time letting things go, and that includes AC units. It can be hard to know when to let go of the old and welcome in the new. To help save you time and make your decision a little easier, keep the following signs in mind. If you find yourself saying, “that sounds like my AC unit,” it might be time for a new air conditioning installation.

Strange Noises

Almost all air conditioners make a bit of low-level noise as they warm up and turn off. However, if you hear loud, unusual noises, it might be a sign that your air conditioner’s time is coming to an end. Buzzing and rattling noises are often indicators of a loose part. Grinding and whistling noises may mean something more serious is happening. Because these issues won’t dissipate over time, it’s crucial to have your air conditioner examined if you hear loud, strange noises.

Frequent Repairs

Daniel Island AC repair is essential for keeping your air conditioner working efficiently. Sometimes, however, it makes more sense from a cost perspective to install a replacement system. This is especially true if your repairs are racking up. Some AC experts suggest using the “$5,000 rule” if you’re considering a new AC install. Simply multiply the age of your air conditioner by the costs you have been paying to repair your unit. If that amount is over $5,000, it may make more financial sense to install a new air conditioner rather than pay for expensive repairs throughout the year.

Higher Energy Bills

If you notice that your energy bill has significantly increased in price, it could be a sign that your HVAC unit is struggling to cool your home effectively. Try to be mindful of your air conditioner’s cooling cycles. If you notice frequent cycles, even in the summer, it could be the reason for your increased energy bill. In these cases, it’s best to have an expert test your system to see if a repair or replacement option is best for your family.

Age of Air Conditioning Unit

This sign is a no-brainer and one of the easiest ways to tell if you need to install a new AC system. On average, your HVAC unit will have a lifespan of 12 to 15 years. If your unit is more than ten years old and doesn’t have the “pizzaz” that it once had, it might be time to think about installing a new air conditioning unit.

R-22 Refrigerant

Old air conditioners usually require a type of refrigerant called R-22. This substance is very harmful to the environment and has been all but outlawed on newer HVAC systems. If your AC unit is old enough to require R-22, you should give serious thought to replacing your system with a newer, environmentally friendly solution.

Call Action Heating & Air Conditioning Today!

Over our 35+ year history, we have built our reputation on honesty, skilled workmanship, and reasonable pricing. If you are on the hunt for the highest quality air conditioning repair in Daniel Island, SC, give our office a call today.

Call us at (843) 890-0532

Protecting Your Investment

Your air conditioning system works very hard every day, all year long to keep your home comfy and cool. Machines that work hard year-round are going to require maintenance and ongoing services to stay operational.

As a family-owned and operated HVAC company in Daniel Island, SC, we know better than anyone how expensive it can be to maintain an AC unit. We know that money doesn’t grow on trees. We also understand that finding last-minute resources to fix an air conditioning system can be challenging. That is why we offer extended warranties for your new or existing AC equipment. With an extended warranty from Action Heating & Air Conditioning, you benefit from repairs, replacement, and additional services covered under warranty. That way, you can enjoy your HVAC products as long as possible.

If you’re having second thoughts about purchasing an extended warranty, consider these points:
  • Generally speaking, HVAC equipment lasts anywhere from 10 to 15 years. However, warranties provided by the factory will often expire before the service life of your cooling unit is over. With an extended warranty, your indoor comfort system is covered even if the factory warranty expires.
  • Having an extended warranty on your AC system gives you the chance to project and plan for any HVAC costs. This helps you balance your budget and anticipate expenses so you aren’t caught off guard. Having a warranty will also help protect your budget against increases in labor and parts costs due to inflation.
  • If you’re thinking of selling your home, having an extended warranty may help raise your home’s value. You may also be able to transfer your extended warranty to your new home if you choose to do so.

Latest News in Daniel Island

Pirates Outlast Talented Field to Win Daniel Island Intercollegiate

CHARLESTON, S.C. – Junior Wenliang Xie (Zhaoqing, China) was the individual runner-up and Andres Acevedo (San Antonio) notched a top-10 finish lifting the Seton Hall men's golf team to the team title of the highly-competitive Daniel Island Intercollegiate on Monday.Playing in a talented field that...

CHARLESTON, S.C. – Junior Wenliang Xie (Zhaoqing, China) was the individual runner-up and Andres Acevedo (San Antonio) notched a top-10 finish lifting the Seton Hall men's golf team to the team title of the highly-competitive Daniel Island Intercollegiate on Monday.

Playing in a talented field that included a pair of top-50 competitors, Virginia (20) and Florida State (48), The Hall led wire-to-wire to claim its first tournament title since the Princeton Invitational in 2017.

The Pirates led the large field of 20 teams with a 6-under-par, 282-282-294-858, besting second-place South Carolina by four strokes. It is Seton Hall's 15th sub-par tournament all-time and its 858 is tied for the fourth-lowest par-72, three-round score in program history.

Xie was as consistent as he was brilliant in Charleston. The junior had four birdies and 11 pars on Monday in route to his third consecutive 1-under-par, 71. Xie finished the three-round event tied for second place among 104 individual golfers with a 3-under-par, 71-71-71-213, just one stroke behind the individual champion, Charleston's Nevill Ruiter. It's his second career sub-par tournament and top-10 finish.

Acevedo had three more birdies in the final round to help him collect a 2-over-par, 74. For the tournament, he tied for 10th with an even-par, 72-70-74-216. It's Acevedo's third career top-10 finish and his second this fall.

Gregor Tait (Martlesham Heath, England) finished his stellar tournament with a 5-over-par, 76, in round three. The graduate student ended the event with a 2-over-par, 71-71-76-218, tying for 16th place overall.

Sophomore Wanxi Sun (Danville, Calif.) helped get the Pirates through the finish line with 15 pars in round three on his way to a 1-over-par, 73. Sun finished the tournament only one stroke behind Tait with a 3-over-par, 68-78-73-219. He tied for 21st place among all individuals.

Senior Deven Ramachandran (San Rafael, Calif.) had a 4-over-par, 76, on Monday. He finished the tournament with a 13-over-par, 83-70-76-229.

Competing as an individual, Ian Lee (Johor, Malaysia) closed out his tournament on Monday with a 6-over-par, 78. He finishes the three-round event with a consistent 17-over-par, 77-78-78-233.

Tournament Details: 2021 DANIEL ISLAND INTERCOLLEGIATE Host: Charleston Southern University Location: Charleston, S.C. Course: Ralston Creek Course Course Vitals: Par-72, 7,446 yards Dates: October 31-November 1, 2021 The Course: As one of the top private golf clubs in Charleston, SC, the Daniel Island Club features the country's only private pairing of golf courses designed by Tom Fazio and Rees Jones playing out of the same clubhouse. Both nationally ranked courses are perfectly integrated into the breathtaking Lowcountry landscape and the country club neighborhood of Daniel Island Park.

Against a stunning backdrop of natural saltwater marsh and tidal creek vistas, acclaimed golf course architect Rees Jones has designed a true low country classic. Ralston Creek, Daniel Island's second 18-hole masterpiece, is a par 72 course playing 7,446 yards from the championship tees.

The Field: In addition to Seton Hall and host Charleston Southern, the large field included 18 other teams including Campbell, College of Charleston, Eastern Kentucky, Florida State, Francis Marion, Gardner-Webb, High Point, Jacksonville State, Lehigh, Presbyterian, Purdue Fort Wayne, South Carolina, USC Aiken, USC Upstate, VCU, Virginia, Western Carolina and Winthrop.

Schedule: The field will play two continuous rounds (36 holes) beginning with an 8:15 a.m. shotgun start on Sunday, and one final round on Monday.

Up Next: This completes the 2021 fall season for Seton Hall. The Pirates will be back in action when it opens the spring season at the Loyola Intercollegiate in Goodyear, Ariz., Feb. 20-22.

2021 DANIEL ISLAND INTERCOLLEGIATE - Team Scores
Pos. Player R1 R2 R3 TOTAL PAR
2 South Carolina 289 282 291 862 -2
5 Virginia 291 281 298 870 +6
6 Campbell 294 288 290 872 +8
9 Western Carolina 300 291 297 888 +24
10 Francis Marion 297 289 305 891 +27
11 Charleston Southern 301 290 301 892 +28
14 Wnthrop 297 303 305 905 +41
15 Gardner-Webb 297 299 313 909 +45
16 Lehigh 305 298 309 912 +48
18 Eastern Kentucky 309 310 312 931 +67
20 Presbyterian 305 306 324 935 +71
2021 DANIEL ISLAND INTERCOLLEGIATE - Seton Hall Individual Scores

Kick off the holidays on Daniel Island with festive events

The annual Daniel Island holiday tree lighting returns this year after a COVID-19 year hiatus. Also scheduled is a movie night in Smythe Park. Here are the details:Daniel Island Holiday Tree Lighting set for Dec. 2 at Guggenheim TerraceThe Daniel Island Community Fund (DICF) invites Daniel Island residents to join fellow neighbors for the annual Daniel Island Holiday Tree Lighting event at Guggenheim Terrace, located at 200 Seven Farms Drive on Thursday, Dec. 2, from 5:30-7:30 p.m.There will be activitie...

The annual Daniel Island holiday tree lighting returns this year after a COVID-19 year hiatus. Also scheduled is a movie night in Smythe Park. Here are the details:

Daniel Island Holiday Tree Lighting set for Dec. 2 at Guggenheim Terrace

The Daniel Island Community Fund (DICF) invites Daniel Island residents to join fellow neighbors for the annual Daniel Island Holiday Tree Lighting event at Guggenheim Terrace, located at 200 Seven Farms Drive on Thursday, Dec. 2, from 5:30-7:30 p.m.

There will be activities and music for the whole family as well as dinner options with several food trucks. Event activities include: Community tree lighting with Santa (the tree will be lit at 6 p.m. sharp), holiday costumed characters, balloon artists, face painters, glitter tattoo artists, holiday DJ music, elf jugglers, festive photo ops and props, holiday games for kids and adults, and a cookie decorating station.

Food and treats will be provided by Bits-N-Bytes, Brunch Holiday, Chick-fil-A, Classy Cheese Chic, Delights Dessert & Coffee, and Holy City Popcorn Company.

This year, the DICF has partnered with the MUSC Shawn Jenkins Children’s Hospital for its Annual Toy Drive. Attendees are encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped gift for the patients at the children’s hospital. A wish list of items can be found online at dicommunity.org in the calendar section under the event. Please note there are a few items listed at the bottom of the page that are needed most at this time.

In the event of inclement weather, check the Daniel Island Property Owners Association Facebook page for any cancellation information.

Holiday Movie & Luminary Night to be held Dec. 9 at Smythe Park

The Daniel Island Community Fund and the Daniel Island School PTA have teamed up to hold an outdoor Holiday Movie & Luminary Night. A night of fun under the stars is scheduled for Thursday, Dec. 9, at 5:30 p.m.

A viewing of the 2018 movie version of “The Grinch” will be projected on a big screen set up along the Smythe Street lawn/greenspace starting at 6 p.m.

Before the movie starts, take a stroll around Smythe Park Lake as the pathways around Smythe Park will be illuminated with hundreds of holiday luminaries sponsored by the Daniel Island School PTA.

Food trucks and other vendors include: Braised in the South, Dashi, Shantastic Treats, and T&T’s Original Kettle Korn.

Bring your own chairs and blankets. In the event of inclement weather, check the Daniel Island Property Owners Association Facebook page for any cancellation information.

Meeting Notes - November 25, 2021

These are the issues coming before various City of Charleston boards and committees and the review results specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. All meetings are open for public comment except the Technical Review Committee (TRC) meetings. Learn more online at charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.Date: Dec. 2• A site plan for Cainhoy Sanders House Improvements at 2019 Sanders House Street on Cainhoy (pre-app). This is a 1.3-acre plat for site improvements to an existing parcel and building to be utilized as a neighbor...

These are the issues coming before various City of Charleston boards and committees and the review results specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. All meetings are open for public comment except the Technical Review Committee (TRC) meetings. Learn more online at charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.

Date: Dec. 2

• A site plan for Cainhoy Sanders House Improvements at 2019 Sanders House Street on Cainhoy (pre-app). This is a 1.3-acre plat for site improvements to an existing parcel and building to be utilized as a neighborhood park. The owner is Cainhoy Land & Timber. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Will Cox, cox.w@tandh.com.

• A site plan for The Waterfront - Phase 2 at Longshore Street on Daniel Island (second review). This is a 3.38-acre plat for the construction of three multi-family buildings consisting of a total of 41 units.The owner is Parcel R Phase 2 Development Company, LLC. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact Bryce Lemon, lemon.b@andh.com.

• A subdivision concept plan for Daniel Island - Haswell at Seven Farms Drive and Haswell Street (second review). This is a 7.88-acre plat for a major subdivision incorporating 22 residential lots. The owner is David Weekley Homes. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Bryce Lemon, lemon.b@andh.com.

Nov. 18 TRC meeting

• A site plan for Abbington Charleston at 2101 Clements Ferry Road on Cainhoy (first review). This is a 7-acre plat for an affordable housing development with 90 apartment units spread across 10 residential buildings with a clubhouse. The owner is Wando Medical Park LLC. The applicant is Abbington Charleston LP. Contact: Matt Monroe, mattmonroe@reaventures.com.

• A road construction plan for Cainhoy First Light Phase 2, a major subdivision plan at Hopewell Drive on Cainhoy (fourth review). This is a 46.9-acre plat road construction plan for a single-family residential subdivision. The owner is Cainhoy Lumber and Timber, LLC. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Will Cox, cox.w@tandh.com. Results: Pending delivery of Engineering comments.

• A site plan for Davis Daniel Island Apartments at Parkline Avenue on Daniel Island (first review). This is a 5-acre plat for a multi-family development with 242 units. Owner is Davis Development, applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact Brian Riley, riley.b@tandh.com.

• A road construction plan for the Marshes at Daniel Island Phases 1A & 1B, a major subdivision at 144 Fairbanks Drive on Daniel Island (seventh review). This is a 16.78-acre plat for road construction plans on a 56-lot subdivision. The owner is SM Charleston, LLC. The applicant is SeamonWhiteside. Contact: Zim Fant, zfant@seamonwhiteside.com.

• Berkeley County Council conducts its regularly scheduled meetings on the fourth Monday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Berkeley County Administration Building, 1003 Highway 52, Moncks Corner.

• Berkeley County Board of Education meetings are held twice each month. The second meeting of each month includes special recognitions of students, employees and community members. Executive Committee meets at 5:30 p.m.; meeting starts at 6:30 p.m.

• Charleston City Council conducts its meetings on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month at 5 p.m.

Historic treasures tell story of DI’s Native American heritage

They may have called Daniel Island home hundreds and even thousands of years ago, but you can still spot evidence of their existence today.An oyster shell midden on the banks of the Wando River.A piece of clay pottery jutting out from the sand along the coastline at low tide.A modern roadway that traces an ancient trading route.An arrowhead buried beneath layers of soil.Native Americans were the first to lay claim to this land. Archaeologist Dr. Eric Poplin, vice president of Brockington & Associates, a...

They may have called Daniel Island home hundreds and even thousands of years ago, but you can still spot evidence of their existence today.

An oyster shell midden on the banks of the Wando River.

A piece of clay pottery jutting out from the sand along the coastline at low tide.

A modern roadway that traces an ancient trading route.

An arrowhead buried beneath layers of soil.

Native Americans were the first to lay claim to this land. Archaeologist Dr. Eric Poplin, vice president of Brockington & Associates, an industry leader in cultural resources management, has been studying Daniel Island’s history for more than 30 years.

“I think the most important thing that our research revealed concerning the Native Americans who lived on Daniel Island and around Charleston Harbor is their adaptability, the way they utilized so much of their environment and surroundings to maintain themselves, their families, their communities, and at times, even larger social groups,” Poplin said. “... These people understood how to survive very well in this place where we live today. This demonstrates the abilities of people to make fruitful lives, much more than just surviving, in a most efficient and commodious manner.”

November has been designated as Native American Heritage Month, a time to remember the rich ancestry and traditions of a people known for their strength, resilience, and immeasurable contributions to the societies in which they lived. Daniel Island’s ties to Native Americans are well documented. The island was once known as Ittiwan or Etiwan Island, a tribute to the tribe that settled in the area centuries ago.

“Native American artifacts occur in fairly large quantities along the margins of the island, with several large concentrations that likely reflect longer term occupations — like villages or farmsteads, particularly during the 1400s-1600s,” Poplin noted. “One of these sites lies near the Volvo Cup Tennis Center (now the Credit One Stadium) and the I-526 Wando River bridge and the other lies to the north on Ralston Creek. However, there is evidence that people have been visiting and spending some time on Daniel Island for the last 13,000 years.”

Former Daniel Island resident Mike Dahlman, co-founder of the Daniel Island Historical Society, described Native American occupation of the island in the book “Daniel Island,” which he co-authored with his son, Michael K. Dahlman Jr.

According to the book, nearly every excavated site has revealed Native American relics, including some of the oldest ceramics found anywhere in North America. “Archaeologists have uncovered arrowheads that date from 10,000 years ago, along with pottery shards that indicate Etiwan Island ... was an important living area from at least 2500 B.C.,” Dahlman wrote.

“A place like Daniel Island would have had an abundant food supply, fishing access, good climate, and the proximity to water was important for everything from transit and trade, to spiritual significance and ritual,” said Daniel Island Historical Society President Jessica Knuff, who is of Cherokee/Pee Dee descent and serves as a board member for the U.S. Department of State’s Native American Foreign Affairs Council. “Many of the reasons people lived on Daniel Island thousands of years ago may be very similar to why we chose to live here now.”

Although not much is known about the Etiwan Tribe specifically, due to the fact that they had no written language, they likely shared many of the common beliefs and cultural practices of neighboring Lowcountry tribes.

“The Etiwan had a Muskogean-based language, so they most likely shared similar cultural connections to the nearby Cusso, Kusso-Natchez, Kiawah, Stono and Yemassee tribes,” Knuff continued. “The beliefs and practices of the historic Etiwan tribe would have morphed over the years with influence from Edisto, Catawba and Cherokee cultures as colonial pressure to move inland brought various Native cultures into settlement towns for survival. South Carolina had a robust Native trading path running directly through the state from the coast to the mountains, so Carolina tribes shared many common cultural influences through travel and trade.”

As part of their 2004 investigation of the Ralston Creek site in what is now Daniel Island Park, Poplin and his team made a significant discovery – a Native American burial.

“This person was buried near one of the Ashley phase houses that once stood on the site,” Poplin noted. “Likely sometime between AD 1570 and 1650. Encountering human remains is always sobering and exciting. So much of what we do as archaeologists involves just pieces of refuse that people used but left behind. We do not deal with actual people that often, but when we do, it is always in the most respectful and sensitive manner possible.”

The remains were ultimately relocated in a manner consistent with Native American traditions. “A Catawba Shaman, or spiritual leader, was present when the remains were removed and reburied on Daniel Island in an area that will not be developed,” Dahlman wrote.

“Special care was taken to retain the geographical alignment of the body.”

It is that tradition and many others that defined Native American life — and it is hoped that through initiatives like Native American Heritage Month their contributions will continue to be recognized.

“South Carolina’s role in shaping Native American culture, religion and existing tribal structures cannot be understated,” Knuff added. “Because South Carolina was an early contact state, much of this influence was due to the slave trade. Spanish and French exploration prior to the arrival of English settlers resulted in diminished numbers of Lowcountry Natives, due to both disease and slavery. Early Carolina settlers arriving from Barbados depended on slave labor for the plantation-style agricultural systems they replicated in the Lowcountry.”

In fact, significant numbers of Native Americans were captured and used in slavery for the purposes of farming, making “Charles Towne” the epicenter of the American Indian Slave Trade, according to Knuff. It is believed that between 1670 and 1720, more Native American slaves were exported out of Charleston than Africans were imported.

“Many Lowcountry Natives were shipped to the West Indies or elsewhere for profit,” Knuff noted. She said the purpose of the American Indian Slave Trade “was not only profit, but also to break up existing community and political institutions of Native tribes on the East Coast. In South Carolina, some of the tribes that exist today, in their modern form, are descendants of tribal groups that escaped the Lowcountry as a result of these colonial influences.”

Today, many descendants of the Etiwan Tribe live in the Summerville/Carnes Crossroads area and are known as the Wassamasaw Indian Nation and the Wassamasaw Tribe of Varnertown.

Poplin said, “We should never think of Native Americans as living just in the past,” since there are many Native American people living in our communities today. “And not just people from the major tribes that we know about,” he added. “They are still here and trying to maintain their identities as Native Americans.”

In a 2019 presentation for the Daniel Island Historical Society, Knuff encouraged all community members to ponder some important questions.

“Whose land do you live on? What do/did they call themselves? What was done to them? How do you benefit from that? What are they doing now? If you can’t answer these questions, ask yourself why — and then find out.”

Philip Simmons sprouts next generation of football-ers and cheerleaders

Philip Simmons High School had a younger look this fall. Nearly 120 children dressed in purple and black descended onto the fields each Saturday during the inaugural season of the Philip Simmons Youth Football and Cheerleading program.According to C.J. Hirschman, who co-directs the football program with Austin McKinney, there was previously no organized youth tackle football on Daniel Island or the Cainhoy peninsula. He said the growth of the Clements Ferry corridor and the Philip Simmons public schools brought a need and a want for t...

Philip Simmons High School had a younger look this fall. Nearly 120 children dressed in purple and black descended onto the fields each Saturday during the inaugural season of the Philip Simmons Youth Football and Cheerleading program.

According to C.J. Hirschman, who co-directs the football program with Austin McKinney, there was previously no organized youth tackle football on Daniel Island or the Cainhoy peninsula. He said the growth of the Clements Ferry corridor and the Philip Simmons public schools brought a need and a want for the league.

“We’ve been overwhelmed with the amount of players and the overall support from our community,” Hirschman said. “From Daniel Island to Clements Ferry to Huger… There’s been an outpouring of support from everybody.”

The first season, 90 football players and 34 cheerleaders from Cainhoy Elementary, the Daniel Island School, Philip Simmons Elementary and Middle Schools, along with some private and home-schooled children, signed on to compete against teams around the region.

“We started off grassroots using social media, road signs and word of mouth, and our local schools sent out flyers to all the kids,” Hirschman said. “We had a lot of people waiting to see how things went the first year and are ready to go for next year.”

By all accounts, the initiative is a success. Hirschman said they are growing the football program from three to six teams next year and the cheerleading program will grow from two to four teams, for a total of more than 200 participants in kindergarten through eighth grade.

“To be able to create lifelong bonds and friendships and bring together all these communities; it’s been great,” Hirschman said.

Cheerleading director Crystal Herring agrees. “It has been absolutely wonderful,” she said. “These girls have bonded and created new friendships and a lot of the girls’ friends will come to the games and ask how they can join.”

Throughout the season, Herring brought in different guest coaches and experienced cheerleaders who helped teach cheers, stunts and dance routines, and “cheer moms” helped with practices and provided safety support during stunts.

“It takes a village,” Herring said. “Parents have been volunteering to bring snacks and water to each game and our cheer moms have helped lead the girls. We definitely couldn’t do it without all the parents’ help.”

The cheerleaders will hold a toy drive for Toys for Tots on Dec. 11, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Famulari’s Pizzeria on Clements Ferry Road. Information about the cheerleading program and signups for next year can be found on Instagram @PSYouthCheer.

Information about the football program and sponsorship opportunities can be found on its Philip Simmons Youth Football Facebook page, or its website at psyouthfb.com.

Philip Simmons Youth Football and Cheerleading is a nonprofit organization that relies on donations and sponsorships for funding. It is part of the South Carolina Youth Football Association that serves children between the ages of 5-12, teaching them the values of teamwork, good sportsmanship, discipline, and self-respect, while also stressing the importance of academics.

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